TV and Movies

When you think of the word entertainment, what comes to mind? Most likely your favorite TV show or your new favorite movie. Today I am going to tell you about the evolution of television, and my thoughts about it.  It all started with photographs, then moving pictures were developed, then silent films, and finally; movies and animation.


First Moving Pictures:

The first ever moving picture was made by Eadweard Muybridge in 1880.  He was the first person to figure out how to make pictures move like real life.  He set up a whole row of cameras with trip wires, so that when the wires were tripped, the camera would take a picture.  He had a horse and rider run in front of the cameras, capturing a whole bunch of pictures of a running horse.  Then he played the film in one of his inventions; the zoöpraxiscope, giving the illusion of an actual moving horse (see the moving picture above). I found this interesting video on how the Zoopraxiscope works.


Developments and Innovations:

Over the next couple of years, innovators took the moving picture idea and ran with it.  George Eastman invented a type of film to replace the glass plates that had limited photographers so much, and eventually, innovators figured out how to make a camera that recorded motion onto a roll of film. This produced what they called silent films. Short movies without sound (most were less than 1/2 and hour long).  By 1928, sound was introduced, and now, since it was more enjoyable to watch, film makers started making full length movies. The well loved Mickey Mouse debuted in 1928 with it’s first episode called Steamboat Willie

In 1931 Merrie Melodies was created making the characters of Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam, Porky pig, Donald Duck, and many more nationwide favorites. The 1930’s and 40’s saw much improvement in the quality of movies.  In the mid 1930’s color was added, and over the next couple of decades, television would become the most popular form of entertainment out there.  In the 1960’s, people had figured out how to do computer animation in movies.  For a long time, it was only used for short periods in movies (such as a car flying down a hill at break-neck speed), but by the 1970-80’s when the animation was becoming better,  filmmakers were using it more and more in movies such as Star Wars and Star Trek.  In 1997, the first computer generated 3D movie (to be seen with 3D glasses) was debuted.


My Thoughts:

Today, we can watch people live on our TVs from across the globe, see videos from outer space, and watch how to do practically anything on YouTube.  While I enjoy watching a good movie, I also know that people waste a whole lot of time watching things instead of doing things.  Kids nowadays go watch their favorite show instead of going outside and playing a game with the neighbor kids a lot of the times. Another bad thing about movies is all the crap that they have in them now.  It’s hard to find a wholesome family movie that upholds good morals and ideals instead of making heroes out of the bad guys, promoting rebellion, and making immorality look good and “cool”.  I don’t want to make it sound like I’m all against movies and TV, and don’t get me wrong; there are thousands of amazing movies out there, it’s just that you have to use a lot of discernment and wisdom sifting through all the trash to find a movie that you would actually want yourself or your kids to watch.


Anyways, in conclusion to today’s essay, movies and TV are truly a great invention, and can be used to bring a good message to the world.   Here is a great movie if y’all need one to watch: Fireproof


Carnegie and Ford

My assignment today was to write an essay about the Industrial age in America. I already wrote an essay on the industrial revolution (here) which is the same thing, so I’m going to tell you a little bit about two of the leading businessmen of the day, as well as how they impacted the United States.

Andrew Carnegie

Carnegie (age 16) with his little brother

Andrew Carnegie was born in Scotland to a poor/middle-class family.  They immigrated America when he was a young teenager, where he soon got a job in a factory as a bobbin boy.  Carnegie was able to get out of the factories, and with the help and influence of his uncle, he got a job as a telegraph messenger. He was so fast at transmitting messages that a railroad businessman took notice of him and hired him as his secretary.  Even though Carnegie was his employee, the man took great interest in him and acted almost like a mentor to him.  Under this businessman’s recommendation, Carnegie saved his money and started investing it in stocks.  The young man had a good eye for deals, and he eventually became pretty well-to-do.  Carnegie then started the Keystone Bridge Co.  During the War (U.S. civil war) the need for iron and steel was growing by the day, so Carnegie and some other men started a steel rolling mill.  He went on to start his own steel company called Carnegie Steel Co. which made him one of the very richest men in America in those days.  Andrew Carnegie is also known for his great philanthropic additions to society.  A few of the notable things that he financed are: Carnegie Hall, Carnegie Endowment for National Peace, Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, and many more.



Henry Ford

Image result for Henry fordHenry Ford; we’ve all heard the name. The man that brought down the price of cars so much that they were now available for the common people, not just the wealthy. He was the inventor of the Model T, and the man who had the first assembly line system in his factories.

Henry Ford was good at tinkering with things and making them work. At the age of 15, he completely took apart a pocket watch and put it back together again, earning himself the reputation of expert watch repairman.  Ford’s first real job was as an apprentice machinist for a company called James F. Flower & Bros.  He got another job as a machinist at the Detroit Dry Dock Company before returning home to the family farm.  He learned how to repair and work on the Westinghouse steam engines, and got hired by Westinghouse to be the repairman.  Ford became an engineer in the Edison Lighting Co, where he worked himself up to the position of chief engineer.

Ford and his wife in the Quadricycle

About this time Ford started experimenting with gas engines and moving things with them. He called his first vehicle a Quadricycle.  Eventually Ford left Edison’s company and started the Detroit Automobile Company.  It turned out to be a failure.

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Model T

After another rocky start, the Ford Motor Co. came to life, introducing the Model T in October of 1908.


Ford had found a way to make cars cheap enough, sturdy enough, and wanted by the common people enough, to have a huge business.  He was the first man to implement the assembly line system into his factories.  The parts of the cars would come slowly down a moving belt, and each person had a specific little thing that they did to each part passing by them.  It was very monotonous work, but Ford made it worth his employees while, often paying them twice as much as other companies payed there employees.  During WWI,  Henry Ford started an airplane business, but it shut down due to the great depression.  Henry Ford died in April of 1947, leaving behind a massive car company, and a revolutionized automobile industry.



The Industrial Revolution (1760-1840)

Today I am going to be writing about a couple of the inventions that helped the Industrial revolution in the United states take place.  Many advancements were made during this time, such as the introduction of coal as a power source (instead of just fire-wood), the invention of the Steam Locomotive, Telegraph, Telephone, Light-Bulb, Steam Boat, and many other things.

The first thing that we are going to talk about is the Cotton Gin.  It was invented by a man named Eli Whitney, in 1793.  At this time, there were still slaves all over the place working at plantations. Their masters would grow Cotton, and then they would force their slaves to pick the millions of tiny black seeds out of the cotton. The Cotton Gin did this for them.  You would feed the cotton in, turn the handle continuously, and it would come out seed free!

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The Cotton Gin

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The next invention is the Steam Locomotive.  This was a huge thing, because it enabled people and equipment to travel somewhat quickly across the United States to the West, where they populated and settled it much quicker than if the long journey would have had to be made on foot.  The first Steam Locomotive was made By Richard Trevithick.
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The third invention that we are going to look at is the Telegraph and Morse Code.  A man named Samuel Morse had an experience in which his wife was dying, he was away, and due to the lack of quick communication, he didn’t know that she had even been sick until she was already dead and her funeral was over.  After that, he dedicated his life to finding some way to make communication quicker.  What he produced is truly amazing.  It is called Morse Code, and it is still used today.  It was a code made up of dashes and dots that were be portrayed in bursts of electricity (making a tapping sound) traveling through wires and to telegraph offices across the country. From there, they would be put into words by telegraph operators and given to whoever the telegraph was sent to.

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These are just a few of the many important inventions that revolutionized our world during the 17 and 1800s.  There isn’t time to write about all of them, so I tried to pick a few of the most important ones.





Liberty and Equality

Liberty and Equality; these are two things that people love, fight and strive for every day. Something that our founding fathers dedicated their lives to winning and ensuring for the future generations.  Something so dear to humans that most wars that have been fought, were defending liberty, equality, or a homeland.  If people don’t have liberty, they don’t have anything. If there isn’t Equality, there are people who are constantly looked down on because of their race, color, etc.

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When a government is controlling what you teach, preach, and believe, you don’t have enough liberty.   You know what, I believe that Liberty is one of the most important things to have in a nation.  If the government strips all of the possible liberty and rights from their citizens, there is going to be constant rebellions and uprisings.  These cost the government money, and a heck of a lot of confusion, chaos, and instability.

Equality is also very important.  Ever since the Revolutionary War, this country has been focused on creating equality for everyone. Starting with the declaration of independence, which stated that all men were created equal.  When the slave trade was abolished, we took another step towards equality between races.

Jim Crow was a big thing that stood in the way of liberty and equality for a long time, because even after the possession of slaves was outlawed, the American people still held the same sentiments toward Black people.  They were viewed as underlings, not as good as white people, and were treated terribly.   The Jim Crow laws were laws that segregated the blacks and whites in everyday places, such as in cafes, restrooms, buses, schools, churches, and even at drinking fountains.

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This was not equality.  Black people, Hispanics, and Orientals were severely persecuted for not being white.  People started standing up for what they believed.  Martin Luther King Junior led marches and  held rallies.  Rosa Parks refused to be treated like trash on a bus, and they both got sent to jail.

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Mr. King leads a march protesting Jim Crow
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Rosa Parks and Mr. King in jail

Huge boycotts were held, and a point was made.  African-Americans were ready for some real equality, and they were going to protest and fight for their God-given rights, until they got them.

Finally, in 1954 a huge step was taken towards equality in the US.  The Supreme Court outlawed the segregation of schools. They finally ruled that it was unconstitutional.  For a while, students had to be escorted by soldiers, so that they wouldn’t get beat up on the way to school, which was now desegregated. (This meant that African-Americans could now go to  “white” schools.

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Soldiers escorting colored children to school.

Anyways, long story short, Jim Crow was ended, and today, equality is becoming more and more popular.  People of other races and colors aren’t treated like animals, and they are given the same rights as white people.

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In conclusion, Liberty and Equality are two of the most important things that you could ever possess.  Be thankful that you live in a country that was built on the principles of freedom, and pray that the rights that we have right now will never be taken away from us.




“Fail-proof horse hoof polish!” the radio screeched out. I turned the dial to the next station “Breaking news, from the London Times! Another perplexing mystery has been solved by the honorable Mr. Sherlock Holmes and his assistant Doctor John Watson! They were brought the case only 3 days ago. A certain young woman named Helen Stoner came to their living quarters on Baker Street with this strange story. Today with us, we have the venerable Dr. Watson who is going to tell us about the case.” I was immensely interested in the work of the two men.

“So, Doctor, what can you tell us about this new case?” I turned my attention back to my radio “Well, I will start at the beginning. Miss Stoner came to us three mornings ago. She lives at her stepfather’s estate in Surrey, near Leatherhead. Two years ago, Miss Stoner woke to a loud shriek and then a whistle from the room next to hers, where her twin sister was sleeping. She rushed into the adjoining room only to hear her sister scream “the speckled band!” and then slump to the floor, dead. Miss Stoner was forced to sleep in her deceased sister’s room for the past week or so due to renovations in her room. It was right next to her stepfather, Dr. Grimesby Roylott’s bedroom. Ever since she moved into the room next to his, she heard the strange whistles that she heard the night that her sister died. The night before Miss Stoner came to us, she heard the whistle accompanied with a hissing sound and got so frightened that she barred her bedroom door, locked the shutters, and took every precaution that nobody or nothing could get into her room.

The next morning, her stepfather was out, so she took a dogcart to my friend and I’s dwelling on Baker Street. After hearing her story (what I’ve just told you) my friend commenced with questioning her, especially about her stepfather. It turns out that he had lived in India for quite a time with his wife, while he learned about the Indian ways of doctoring. His wife died in India, leaving 200 pounds to each of her daughters upon the event of their marriage. He had served a sentence in prison for killing his Indian butler out of pure rage, and that he was in a good deal of debt. Holmes also found that he had no love for his stepdaughters whatsoever, was often gone for extended periods of time and kept many Indian animals for pets, including a cheetah and baboon, of which Miss Stoner was very frightened of. We also learned that when the young lady’s sister was going to be married the day after she died, that Miss Stoner was at this time engaged also, and that she was very scared of her stepfather.
We arranged to come that afternoon, while Dr. Roylott would still be out and investigate. Miss stoner left our rooms, and not 10 minutes later, we heard an angry tug on the bell rope, and pounding footsteps coming up the stairs. A large, commanding figure stood in our doorway. He introduced himself as Dr. Grimesby Roylott and commenced in telling us that his stepdaughter was of a very excitable nature, prone to over exaggerate things and that if we believed anything she said, we were mad. He also told us that if he found us meddling with his affairs, it would not bode well for us. He grabbed the fire poker and with two large hands, bent it almost completely over as if to prove his strength, and then pounded back down the stairs. Holmes chuckled, picked up the poker and calmly bent it back to its normal shape. We could see now how Miss Stoner was frightened of him.

That afternoon, when we arrived, we found that thankfully, the Doctor was still gone. Miss Stoner took us up to her bedroom, which my companion inspected carefully. There was no way for anything or anyone to get through the window. It was barred, shuttered, and locked. After looking the whole room over, Holmes noticed three strange things. There was a bell cord next to the bed that didn’t ring any bells, the bed was bolted to the floor, and a ventilator that went into the adjoining room, which happened to be Dr. Roylott’s own bedroom, where we went next. What we found was a large messy room with a large safe in it, a table covered in papers, a chair with a stick placed on it that had a leather loop on the end, a saucer of milk, and a few odds and ends from India. My friend must have seen something that I didn’t, because I could tell that he was very pleased.
After inspecting the grounds and giving Miss Stoner some instructions, we went home to Baker street. However, we didn’t stay there long. Holmes told me to get my revolver, he took a few things, and then we left. I had no clue where we were going. We ended up at a lodging house across the road from the Roylott estate, with a perfect view of the house. It was then that I recalled the instructions that Holmes gave Miss Stoner. He had told her to light an oil lamp and put it in the window of her room, until her stepfather had gone to bed, and had ceased to move around in his room. She was also supposed to pack a valise and be ready to leave at a moment’s notice. We settled down in a room at the lodging house and waited until dark. About 9:30, the oil lamp went out. Holmes jumped up, grabbing his coat and mine, which he handed to me, as I put my revolver snuggly in the inside pocket.
As we snuck into the Roylott grounds we were startled by the baboon running across the lawn. Climbing into the window that led into Miss Stoner’s room (she had opened the shutters and bars) Holmes helped her out the window and told her that there was a cab waiting at the lodging house for her, to take her to her Aunt’s house for safety. Then, we settled down for a long night of intense waiting. Our nerves were strung high, and our ears were tuned to the slightest noise from the room next to the one that we were occupying.
At about 1:35 am, we heard a stirring from the next room. It was followed by the sound of about 10 footsteps, a slight grating noise, another 10 steps, the sound of a chair scraping lightly across the floor, and the squeak of wood as someone stood on top of the chair. Holmes silently picked up his riding whip off of the floor and looked as though he was ready to spring. All of a sudden, we heard the whistle that Miss Stoner had told us about and saw something sliding out of the ventilator, and onto the bell cord. At the same time, we heard a hissing sound, akin to that of steam escaping a pressurized water container. Holmes sprung up with a wild yell and started attacking the bell cord with his stout leather whip. He shoved something back through the ventilator, and then we heard a blood-curdling scream and a heavy thud. We raced to Dr. Roylott’s room and forced the door open. He was lying on the floor with a speckled snake latched onto his neck. Holmes picked the snake up with the stick with the leather loop on the end, shoved it in the safe, and slammed the door. Dr. Grimesby Roylott was dead within 5 minutes. It turns out that the doctor had brought the black and yellow speckled cobra from India and trained it with a series of whistle signals. He had been sending the snake through the ventillator every night for a week, waiting for the snake to find it’s mark. Fortunately for Miss Stoner, it hadn’t.”

“The rest of the story in just a minute.” The radio man’s voice came through, high pitched and nasal. The broadcast was interrupted here by advertisements. I waited until the obnoxious things ended “And now, the rest of the story from Dr. John Watson.” I leaned forward in my chair “When we were finally back in our rooms at Baker Street, I asked my friend how he had deduced that Dr. Roylott was the murderer. He started telling me all of the many clues that I had missed; The dirty fingerprints on the wall going up to the ventilator, the signs on the chair of it being stood on frequently, the snake holder (the stick with a leather loop attached to the end), and the saucer of milk to feed the snake with, and the hissing that Miss Stoner had heard the night before. Also, that the only motive for the murder (and attempted murder) of the two young women was to be able to keep the money that the girls’ mother had left them. Another crucial clue was that Dr. Roylott had construction going on that made the girl have to sleep in the room next to him before the first murder, as well as the attempted second murder. The murder and attempted murder happened just before both girls were to be married (this is when they would have claimed the money that their mother left them), though 2 years apart, thus enhancing his theory and the suspected motive for the crime.”

“I had seen a few of these clues, not realizing the importance of them, while the others, I was totally oblivious to.”

“And what has become of Miss Stoner?” The high pitched nasal voice came again. “Is she still living at the Roylott estate?”
“Miss Helen Stoner is now living with her Aunt out in the English countryside until the full police investigation is over, and she is married.”
“Quite an impressive case, Doctor” the radio man said. “Yes, my friend Mr. Sherlock Holmes is a fantastic detective, and never ceases to amaze me with his admirable deducing skills.”
I flipped the radio off, turned my collar up, and went out to the misty street to start my long day of work. Detective work, to be precise, and a new case had come in today. My name is Sherlock Holmes.

More Literature Analysis of a Knight of the White Cross

In my last essay I talked about the setting and style of the book assigned for English, so today I’ll be writing about the character development and plot.


The Plot development of A Knight of the White Cross, by G.A. Henty

As I said in my last essay, most of Henty’s books pretty much all have the same base story. A handsome, strong, young man rises in fame and fortune and becomes a hero to the country. They normally end up with the fella’ marrying a gal that he rescued from some terrible thing. In A Knight of the White Cross, a young man named Gervaise joins the Order of St. John, in the magnificent city of Rhodes. He has a good thinking head, as well as being a great warrior at a young age (due to the training he received ever since he was a small child). He is a Page to the Grand Master for 3 years, before becoming a professed knight. Soon after, he was sent on a galley with a bunch of other knights. They encountered 5 or 6 pirate ships that they eventually captured with the help of two other galleys that were also on patrol. While out on the ocean, Gervaise showed himself worthy of being dubbed a real Knight upon their return. In later events, Gervaise did lots of things that earned him great renown including capturing 13 pirate ships and destroying 10 more with only one galley. He was a favorite with the Grand Master and all his fellow knights. He took part in the defense of Rhodes during the famous siege of Rhodes. In the end of the book, he marries a girl from Genoa and lives happily ever after.

Character Development

Really the only characters that develop enough to mention are Gervaise, his best friend Ralph Harcourt, and Lady Claudia (the girl he marries). Gervaise starts out being a 13-year-old boy, working as Page to the Grand master of the Order of St. John. Later on, he becomes a professed knight, then a real knight, the captain of a galley (at the age of 17), a slave (he got captured, but then escapes), and then finally a married man. Sir Ralph Harcourt starts out as a professed knight and becomes a real knight at the same time as Gervaise. He is 1st mate to Gervaise on his galley, and eventually, gets awarded with the command of his own galley. Lady Claudia is first introduced in the book as a serious 14-year-old girl. She isn’t talked about a lot since she lives in a whole different country than Gervaise, but she’s talked about enough to know that as she became a woman, she was the beauty of Genoa, and refused many offers for her hand in marriage. When Gervaise asks her to marry him, she accepts and becomes his wife.


This Weeks History Essay

This week I started 8th-grade history through the Ron Paul Curriculum. The class is taught by Bradley Fish Jr. Today, I am going to overview what I learned this week. Focusing on a little bit of history from the Middle East.

The Middle East

This civilization includes modern-day Jordan, Turkey, Israel, Syria, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Lebanon. You see, the ancient people from this area were farmers, so they needed a great place to plant their crops and keep them lush and green. The middle east was a great choice because there was a semi-circle kind of area that was especially fertile. The Tigris, Euphrates, and Nile rivers all flow through this area, which was called the “fertile crescent” after it’s lush farming land (see pictures below). Between the years of 1000 BC and 500 AD, the middle east changed hands a lot, in fact, 5 different powers ruled during those 1500 years. Babylon, Persia, Parthia, Rome, and for a short time, Alexander the Great was in control.

In 750 AD, the Muslims took over the government, converting it to their religious system, to start forming the Islamic middle east that we know today.

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Map of the Fertile Crescent
Farms in the Fertile Crescent