The Industrial Revolution (1760-1840)

Today I am going to be writing about a couple of the inventions that helped the Industrial revolution in the United states take place.  Many advancements were made during this time, such as the introduction of coal as a power source (instead of just fire-wood), the invention of the Steam Locomotive, Telegraph, Telephone, Light-Bulb, Steam Boat, and many other things.

The first thing that we are going to talk about is the Cotton Gin.  It was invented by a man named Eli Whitney, in 1793.  At this time, there were still slaves all over the place working at plantations. Their masters would grow Cotton, and then they would force their slaves to pick the millions of tiny black seeds out of the cotton. The Cotton Gin did this for them.  You would feed the cotton in, turn the handle continuously, and it would come out seed free!

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The Cotton Gin

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The next invention is the Steam Locomotive.  This was a huge thing, because it enabled people and equipment to travel somewhat quickly across the United States to the West, where they populated and settled it much quicker than if the long journey would have had to be made on foot.  The first Steam Locomotive was made By Richard Trevithick.
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The third invention that we are going to look at is the Telegraph and Morse Code.  A man named Samuel Morse had an experience in which his wife was dying, he was away, and due to the lack of quick communication, he didn’t know that she had even been sick until she was already dead and her funeral was over.  After that, he dedicated his life to finding some way to make communication quicker.  What he produced is truly amazing.  It is called Morse Code, and it is still used today.  It was a code made up of dashes and dots that were be portrayed in bursts of electricity (making a tapping sound) traveling through wires and to telegraph offices across the country. From there, they would be put into words by telegraph operators and given to whoever the telegraph was sent to.

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These are just a few of the many important inventions that revolutionized our world during the 17 and 1800s.  There isn’t time to write about all of them, so I tried to pick a few of the most important ones.

-Odessa

 

 

 

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Liberty and Equality

Liberty and Equality; these are two things that people love, fight and strive for every day. Something that our founding fathers dedicated their lives to winning and ensuring for the future generations.  Something so dear to humans that most wars that have been fought, were defending liberty, equality, or a homeland.  If people don’t have liberty, they don’t have anything. If there isn’t Equality, there are people who are constantly looked down on because of their race, color, etc.

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When a government is controlling what you teach, preach, and believe, you don’t have enough liberty.   You know what, I believe that Liberty is one of the most important things to have in a nation.  If the government strips all of the possible liberty and rights from their citizens, there is going to be constant rebellions and uprisings.  These cost the government money, and a heck of a lot of confusion, chaos, and instability.

Equality is also very important.  Ever since the Revolutionary War, this country has been focused on creating equality for everyone. Starting with the declaration of independence, which stated that all men were created equal.  When the slave trade was abolished, we took another step towards equality between races.

Jim Crow was a big thing that stood in the way of liberty and equality for a long time, because even after the possession of slaves was outlawed, the American people still held the same sentiments toward Black people.  They were viewed as underlings, not as good as white people, and were treated terribly.   The Jim Crow laws were laws that segregated the blacks and whites in everyday places, such as in cafes, restrooms, buses, schools, churches, and even at drinking fountains.

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Segregation

This was not equality.  Black people, Hispanics, and Orientals were severely persecuted for not being white.  People started standing up for what they believed.  Martin Luther King Junior led marches and  held rallies.  Rosa Parks refused to be treated like trash on a bus, and they both got sent to jail.

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Mr. King leads a march protesting Jim Crow
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Rosa Parks and Mr. King in jail

Huge boycotts were held, and a point was made.  African-Americans were ready for some real equality, and they were going to protest and fight for their God-given rights, until they got them.

Finally, in 1954 a huge step was taken towards equality in the US.  The Supreme Court outlawed the segregation of schools. They finally ruled that it was unconstitutional.  For a while, students had to be escorted by soldiers, so that they wouldn’t get beat up on the way to school, which was now desegregated. (This meant that African-Americans could now go to  “white” schools.

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Soldiers escorting colored children to school.

Anyways, long story short, Jim Crow was ended, and today, equality is becoming more and more popular.  People of other races and colors aren’t treated like animals, and they are given the same rights as white people.

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In conclusion, Liberty and Equality are two of the most important things that you could ever possess.  Be thankful that you live in a country that was built on the principles of freedom, and pray that the rights that we have right now will never be taken away from us.

 

-Odessa

This Weeks History Essay

This week I started 8th-grade history through the Ron Paul Curriculum. The class is taught by Bradley Fish Jr. Today, I am going to overview what I learned this week. Focusing on a little bit of history from the Middle East.

The Middle East

This civilization includes modern-day Jordan, Turkey, Israel, Syria, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Lebanon. You see, the ancient people from this area were farmers, so they needed a great place to plant their crops and keep them lush and green. The middle east was a great choice because there was a semi-circle kind of area that was especially fertile. The Tigris, Euphrates, and Nile rivers all flow through this area, which was called the “fertile crescent” after it’s lush farming land (see pictures below). Between the years of 1000 BC and 500 AD, the middle east changed hands a lot, in fact, 5 different powers ruled during those 1500 years. Babylon, Persia, Parthia, Rome, and for a short time, Alexander the Great was in control.

In 750 AD, the Muslims took over the government, converting it to their religious system, to start forming the Islamic middle east that we know today.

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Map of the Fertile Crescent
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Farms in the Fertile Crescent

 

The Battle of Jumonville Glen

The Battle of Jumonville Glen was a 15-minute skirmish that started the wheels in motion for the 7 years war (also called the French and Indian war).

It all started on a cold winter night. A troop of English and Indian soldiers were marching toward a place called Fort Necessity.  The fort was in construction, and the soldiers were sent to keep it safe from the Canadians while it was being built. The English soldiers were commanded by a man named George Washington, (yes, the same man that let the continental army in the American Revolution) and the Indian soldiers were being led by a man named Tanacharison.

Washington and Tanacharison were about 5 miles apart when word came from the Indians that they had spotted the Canadian encampment.  (As a side note really quick, the band of 35 or so Canadians led by Joseph Jumonville, was just a small part of a larger group of soldiers. The larger group had already captured the partly constructed fort that Washington was on his way to defend.  Jumonville and his men were sent to warn Washington not to start messing around with the Canadian’s claimed land).  Washington marched his men the 5 miles that night to where Tanacharison was and set up an ambush.  The next morning, the Canadians were surprised by a bunch of soldiers attacking the camp.  The skirmish lasted only about 15 minutes, but quite a few of the Canadians were killed, including Joseph Jumonville.  Not including a couple of men that managed to escape, all of the Canadian survivors were taken as prisoners.  The dead were either just left in the field where the battle took place or  buried in very shallow graves.  George Washington pushed his men on to the fort.

When word came to the main party of Canadians, Jumonville’s brother was raving mad.  He took a troop of 600 soldiers, attacked Washington and his men and forced him to surrender.  The surrendering terms were written in french, which Washington couldn’t read, so it is questionable if he knew what he was agreeing to when he signed that paper. It turns out that the paper had a confession that he had had Jumonville specifically assassinated in the battle.   That was used against him later in life.

The next year, more and more small conflicts kept happening, and essentially grew into a full blown war.  In fact, both France and England declared war on each other in 1756.  This was the 7 years war, or the French and Indian war.

George Whitefield

George Whitefield (pronounced Whit-field, not White-field) was a influential traveling preacher during the period of the Great Awakening in the 13 Colonies. He was actually born in England, but found his calling in the new world. He actually helped get them going with breaking away from England too.

George Whitefield was born in 1714, in the town of Gloucester England.  His parents owned a inn, but business wasn’t very good, and they were rather poor.  Whitefield entered Oxford as a servitor to pay his way through (a servitor is someone who works for the higher class students cleaning rooms, carrying books, etc).  During his time in college, Whitefield met the Wesley brothers (Charles and John) and joined a club with them called “the Holy Club”, where he was introduced to theology and such things.  Although Whitefield was learning all about christian theology and God, he didn’t really have an actual relationship with God.

God revealed himself to George, and he became very passionate about serving and following in God’s path.  He started preaching and his reputation just grew and grew. It is said that he could preach so loud that you could hear him from five miles away!   Whitefield visited America and saw the need for an Orphanage and some good old preaching.  He returned to England, rose funds, and then went back to the colonies.  A orphanage was built and he called it “Bethesda”.  When Whitefield wasn’t at the orphanage, he was traveling around preaching at revival.

George Whitefield kept on with his calling until his death in September of 1770, at age 55.  He was one of the most influential preachers of the time, and is remembered as one of the leaders of the Great Awakening.

 

 

 

4 of the 13 Colonies Summary

Today I’m going to give you a very brief summary of four of the original 13 Colonies. Hopefully I can get them in order.

#1. Virginia

Virginia was started in 1607 by the Virginia Company. Sir Walter named it after the Virgin Queen, Elizabeth the 1st of England.  Jamestown was the first settlement. The life for the colonists in Virginia was a hard one. The colony almost failed many times, but always found a way to survive.

#2. Massachusetts

The Massachusett Bay Colony was started in 1620 by the colonists from the Mayflower.  The story of the mayflower and the puritans is pretty famous, so I won’t tell you all about it. The first settlement was Plymouth. Massachusetts became a royal colony in 1691.

#3. New Hampshire

New Hampshire was started in 1921.  John Wheelwright, and his sister-in-law, Anne Hutchinson started a settlement called Exeter in New Hampshire. The two of them were banished from Boston, so they took some other people with them and started Exeter.

#4. Maryland

The first settlers landed in Maryland in 1633.  King Charles I gave the charter to Lord Baltimore. Leonard Calvert, who was Lord Baltimore’s son was the one that led the colonists into the land and settle it.

Saxon Culture

3/23/2017
Teacher: Bradley Fish Jr.

In my 7th grade English class, I have been reading a book called Wulf the Saxon, by G.A. Henty. It’s all about the Norman invasion of England. This week for my writing assignment, I need to write about the culture of the Anglo-Saxon people.

The Anglo-Saxon people started out as a bunch of Germanic tribes that settled in the part of Europe that is now England.  The tribes eventually united and grew into a country with a King, and different Earldoms and Earls ruling over them.  In each earldom, there were the people that lived in them that were free men that were farmers, or some other occupation such as a metal worker or something like that.

There were not a lot of trained, paid soldiers, so when a  war started, all the farmers and people were called from their homes, farms, and businesses to fight. This made them weaker than their opponents because their men would leave to get back to their farms and occupations as soon as their required time in service was up.  This left the king relatively helpless at times because he had practically no army.

The Saxons were pagan, believing in what seems like thousands of different gods, but eventually, some catholic missionaries came and converted most of England.  King Alfred helped spread the popularity of Catholicism also.  The Saxons had cities and villages and monasteries and convents and everything.

Over time, England began to adopt more and more civilized ideas and things, to become one of the most powerful country’s in Europe.