The Battle of Jumonville Glen

The Battle of Jumonville Glen was a 15-minute skirmish that started the wheels in motion for the 7 years war (also called the French and Indian war).

It all started on a cold winter night. A troop of English and Indian soldiers were marching toward a place called Fort Necessity.  The fort was in construction, and the soldiers were sent to keep it safe from the Canadians while it was being built. The English soldiers were commanded by a man named George Washington, (yes, the same man that let the continental army in the American Revolution) and the Indian soldiers were being led by a man named Tanacharison.

Washington and Tanacharison were about 5 miles apart when word came from the Indians that they had spotted the Canadian encampment.  (As a side note really quick, the band of 35 or so Canadians led by Joseph Jumonville, was just a small part of a larger group of soldiers. The larger group had already captured the partly constructed fort that Washington was on his way to defend.  Jumonville and his men were sent to warn Washington not to start messing around with the Canadian’s claimed land).  Washington marched his men the 5 miles that night to where Tanacharison was and set up an ambush.  The next morning, the Canadians were surprised by a bunch of soldiers attacking the camp.  The skirmish lasted only about 15 minutes, but quite a few of the Canadians were killed, including Joseph Jumonville.  Not including a couple of men that managed to escape, all of the Canadian survivors were taken as prisoners.  The dead were either just left in the field where the battle took place or  buried in very shallow graves.  George Washington pushed his men on to the fort.

When word came to the main party of Canadians, Jumonville’s brother was raving mad.  He took a troop of 600 soldiers, attacked Washington and his men and forced him to surrender.  The surrendering terms were written in french, which Washington couldn’t read, so it is questionable if he knew what he was agreeing to when he signed that paper. It turns out that the paper had a confession that he had had Jumonville specifically assassinated in the battle.   That was used against him later in life.

The next year, more and more small conflicts kept happening, and essentially grew into a full blown war.  In fact, both France and England declared war on each other in 1756.  This was the 7 years war, or the French and Indian war.

Advertisements

George Whitefield

George Whitefield (pronounced Whit-field, not White-field) was a influential traveling preacher during the period of the Great Awakening in the 13 Colonies. He was actually born in England, but found his calling in the new world. He actually helped get them going with breaking away from England too.

George Whitefield was born in 1714, in the town of Gloucester England.  His parents owned a inn, but business wasn’t very good, and they were rather poor.  Whitefield entered Oxford as a servitor to pay his way through (a servitor is someone who works for the higher class students cleaning rooms, carrying books, etc).  During his time in college, Whitefield met the Wesley brothers (Charles and John) and joined a club with them called “the Holy Club”, where he was introduced to theology and such things.  Although Whitefield was learning all about christian theology and God, he didn’t really have an actual relationship with God.

God revealed himself to George, and he became very passionate about serving and following in God’s path.  He started preaching and his reputation just grew and grew. It is said that he could preach so loud that you could hear him from five miles away!   Whitefield visited America and saw the need for an Orphanage and some good old preaching.  He returned to England, rose funds, and then went back to the colonies.  A orphanage was built and he called it “Bethesda”.  When Whitefield wasn’t at the orphanage, he was traveling around preaching at revival.

George Whitefield kept on with his calling until his death in September of 1770, at age 55.  He was one of the most influential preachers of the time, and is remembered as one of the leaders of the Great Awakening.

 

 

 

The Theme of Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson.

 

The theme of a book is the message, moral, or main point of the book.  Today I am going to be telling you about the theme of the book Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson.  I hope you enjoy it!

Treasure Island is a pretty cool book by itself, but if you dig a little bit deeper, there is a moral to the story.  Personally, I think that the moral is to be smart with who you hang out with, and before you trust someone with anything important, get to know him or her well first. For instance, in the book, Doctor Livesley entrusted the choosing of the crew of the Hispaniola to Long John Silver, whom he had just met a few days before.  This was a huge mistake, because he went and hired all of his pirate buddies who helped him with the mutiny after they arrived at treasure island.  During the whole thing, before the mutiny Long John acted perfectly normal and good, but when they got onto the island, he became a dangerous person. He actually even murdered a few of the true members of the crew.

That is my take on the theme of Treasure Island. Have you read the book before? What did you think the moral was?  Let me know in the comments box!

-Odessa