George Whitefield

George Whitefield (pronounced Whit-field, not White-field) was a influential traveling preacher during the period of the Great Awakening in the 13 Colonies. He was actually born in England, but found his calling in the new world. He actually helped get them going with breaking away from England too.

George Whitefield was born in 1714, in the town of Gloucester England.  His parents owned a inn, but business wasn’t very good, and they were rather poor.  Whitefield entered Oxford as a servitor to pay his way through (a servitor is someone who works for the higher class students cleaning rooms, carrying books, etc).  During his time in college, Whitefield met the Wesley brothers (Charles and John) and joined a club with them called “the Holy Club”, where he was introduced to theology and such things.  Although Whitefield was learning all about christian theology and God, he didn’t really have an actual relationship with God.

God revealed himself to George, and he became very passionate about serving and following in God’s path.  He started preaching and his reputation just grew and grew. It is said that he could preach so loud that you could hear him from five miles away!   Whitefield visited America and saw the need for an Orphanage and some good old preaching.  He returned to England, rose funds, and then went back to the colonies.  A orphanage was built and he called it “Bethesda”.  When Whitefield wasn’t at the orphanage, he was traveling around preaching at revival.

George Whitefield kept on with his calling until his death in September of 1770, at age 55.  He was one of the most influential preachers of the time, and is remembered as one of the leaders of the Great Awakening.

 

 

 

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